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GAY? President Abraham Lincoln (VSA)
Johannes Comestor het interessante onthullings mbt tot die 16de VSA President gemaak. Lees 21 Feb 13

Ek haal die volgende aan wat vir die leser moontlik interessant behoort te wees.
(Wikipedia). The sexual orientation of Abraham Lincoln is a topic of debate[1] among some scholars. While Lincoln was married to Mary Todd from November 4, 1842, until his death on April 15, 1865, and fathered four children with her, psychologist C. A. Tripp has observed that Lincoln's problematic and distant relationship with women stood in contrast to his warmer relations with a number of men in his life and that two of those relationships had possible homosexual overtones. (Terloops. Oscar Wilde was ook getroud met kinders)

In his 1926 biography of Lincoln, Carl Sandburg made an allusion to the early relationship of Lincoln and his friend Joshua Fry Speed as having "a streak of lavender, and spots soft as May violets". "Streak of lavender" was slang in the period for an effeminate man, and later connoted homosexuality.

Lincoln wrote a poem that described a marriage-like relation between two men, which included the lines:
For Reuben and Charles have married two girls,
But Billy has married a boy.
The girls he had tried on every side,
But none he could get to agree;
All was in vain, he went home again,
And since that he's married to Natty.
Tripp notes that Lincoln's awareness of homosexuality and openness in penning this "bawdy poem" "was unique for the time period."

Lincoln's stepmother, Sarah Bush Lincoln, commented that he "never took much interest in the girls".

Captain David Derickson was Lincoln's bodyguard and companion between September 1862 and April 1863. They shared a bed during the absences of Lincoln's wife, until Derickson was promoted in 1863. Derickson was twice married and fathered ten children, but whatever the exact level of intimacy of the relationship, it was the subject of gossip. Elizabeth Woodbury Fox, the wife of Lincoln's naval aide, wrote in her diary for November 16, 1862, "Tish says, 'Oh, there is a Bucktail soldier here devoted to the president, drives with him, and when Mrs L is not home, sleeps with him.' What stuff!"
 
In ‘n ander weergawe “Was Abraham Lincoln Gay?”, lees ons:

On April 15, 1837, an impoverished Abraham Lincoln, twenty-eight years old, arrived in Springfield, Illinois to set up his first law practice. One of his first stops was at the general store, where he thought he might buy a bed. Standing behind the counter was a twenty-two-year-old man, the shopkeeper Joshua Fry Speed. Speed totaled up the cost of the bed, mattress, blankets, pillows etcetera to be a whopping seventeen dollars. Well, that was a lot of money back then and Abe simply didn’t have it. As Speed later recalled, when he looked across the counter, "I never saw a sadder face." Lincoln asked if he might buy the bed on credit.

But Joshua had a better idea. Taking Lincoln by the hand, he led him up the steps to his living quarters above the store, showed him the small room with a bed in the corner and said, “Why don’t you just sleep here with me.” And the two men continued to live and sleep together for nearly four years in that bed in that room.

Even as president, Lincoln formed a close attachment to a soldier, Captain David V. Derickson, who was the commander of his guards. In 1862 and 1863, they shared a bed in the White House and a getaway cottage at the outskirts of town. Believe me, there were plenty of extra beds in the White House.

Even thirty-three years later, Thomas Chamberlain, one of Lincoln’s bodyguards, remembered the relationship of the two men when he wrote a history of the regiment:

"Captain Derickson, in particular, advanced so far in the President's confidence and esteem that, in Mrs Lincoln's absence, he frequently spent the night at his cottage, sleeping in the same bed with him, and -- it is said -- making use of His Excellency's night-shirt!”
 
Jaco Fourie

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Duitswester
2013-03-11 @11:47


Maar net nog 'n patetiese poging van die verwronges om hulself te regverdig deur die idee te probeer skep dat baie "belangrikes" net so verwronge was.

Pateties, in my altyd-beskeie opinie, terwyl ek alle ander hul opinies gun.

 

Duitswester

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jaco fourie
2013-03-11 @21:29
Duitswester,

Wat buite Afrika woon en nie meer in Namibia nie, tog homself nog als "Duitswester" , 'n voor 1ste wêreldoorlog konotasie, wil noem.  Hoekom?  weet sy g*d alleenlik? Al sy argumente, maak nie saak wat die onderwerp is nie,  neem die vorm van suiwer tussenwerpsels, sonder enige konkrete teen-argumente.  Indien hy nie met iets saamstem nie, behoort hy 'n objektiewe rede te gee hoekom nie, of eerder sy smoel toehou.

Indien hy my opskrif duidelik gelees het, sou hy agtergekom het dat ek die saak ook bevraagteken, met 'n vraagteken agter Gay? 

Jaco Fourie
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